GuyanaLive Blog Everything Guyana

27Sep/07

International Bar 2007

The Rotary Club of Georgetown held its annual International Bar at thirst Park on Saturday, September 22nd. This event was well supported by Guyanese from all walks of life. The environment was wonderful and inviting; the entertainment was excellent and there was no shortage of food and drinks for the many persons present. The organizers covered almost every hiccup with thorough planning and experience gained over the years. There were two mobile ticket booths located just outside the entrance; this served to deter the usual bootleg ticket vendors such big events attract. The security was tight as was expected. Males and females entered the ground separately and were searched by GEB security officers equipped with metal detectors. This was done to prevent the entry of firearms and other weapons unto the premises. There is a small walkway leading to the ground. Patrons used this walkway to have their tickets punched by Rotary Club members seated just inside the park. This served to prevent a backup of persons at the main entrance, allowing the free flow of persons onto the ground.

Immediately upon entering the ground it was clear that this was a major and very successful event. If you are familiar with the size of Thirst Park, you know that it would take quite a crowd to full it; the Rotary Club pulled this accomplished this effortlessly. The crowd consisted primarily of young people. There was a "liming" atmosphere near the entrance to the ground where many persons were engaged in hearty conversation, while others played the various games available. The older patrons were found in the section directly in front of the stage. This section was furnished with chairs and tables to allow comfort while enjoying the live entertainment offered. There was no shortage of activities for the attendees. There were several game booths that afforded persons the opportunity to win prizes. In addition to the games, there were food booths set up around the perimeter of the ground so that regardless of one's location, food was never far away. These booths sold a mind-boggling variety of dishes. There was food to satisfy every taste, craving and eating habit. The only persons who faced any kind of problem were those who eat pretty much everything. For these, deciding what to get first and what looked and smelt best, was quite a task. The drinks bars were well stocked and offered a variety of beverages, catering to everyone's preference.

The evening's entertainment was rich, and every item was well executed. The event was used as a platform to display Guyanese talent as all performances by local artistes who represented both themselves and our entertainment industry very well. The main performances were by the various dance schools and groups found in Guyana. The dances were choreographed to some of today's hottest dancehall, R&B, hip hop and soul selections. This highlighted not only skill, but versatility on the part of instructors as well as students. There was a comedy segment done by Mr. Kirk Jardine a.k.a. CHOW POW. He was very well received. The originality and hilarity of his jokes caught the attention of those persons who were not even paying attention to the stage initially. International Bar has become a calendar event for Guyanese of all ages.

The Rotary Club of Georgetown must be congratulated on a job well done. If you missed it this year, you missed a great time as well as the opportunity to enjoy a variety of quality Guyanese entertainment and cuisine.

by Andrew Ross 

17Sep/07

The City Mall

One of the most, if not the most, new and exciting places for young people to socialize is the City Mall located in the capital city at the corners of Camp and Regent Street. This establishment is yet another indication of the modernization taking place in Guyana today thanks, in part, to the private sector.

As you enter the huge building you are entering a centrally air conditioned atmosphere that is encouraging and inviting. You are greeted by a spectacle that is the first of its kind in Guyana. The escalator is the first, and quite possibly the main attraction located within the four story building. I remember clearly that when the mall was first opened to the public, there were curious persons coming down to Camp and Regent just to take a trip up and down the escalators. There were those who were afraid and nervous but as soon as this feeling was overcome by curiosity and courage they bravely took a step onto the machine. There were also some persons who fell while attempting to use the machine. Their pain and embarrassment served only to amuse those who would have witnessed the incident-there was no sympathy. There was one lady who was unaware as to which was up and which was down and attempted to go up the wrong one and fell flat on her back as a result.

The City Mall offers four floors of shopping convenience and pleasure. The ground floor features stores and booths which have movies, cell phones and craft items. The Food Court is also found on this floor. Various eating houses have taken the opportunity to give their business more exposure. This makes items such as burgers, ice cream, fried chicken, milkshakes, juices, sandwiches and pastries available to the mall-goers. There is also an area within the Food Court for seating purposes and furnished with tables for you to enjoy your meal. On the first and second floors you can find clothing, footwear, lingerie, personal hygiene items, colognes, gift items and there is even a barbershop and an internet cafe. On the third floor there is an arcade with various exciting games for the fun- loving individual. There is also a double theatre. on the third floor that is not quite completed which should bring more visitors to the mall as soon as its doors are opened.

With all the features and attractions present in the mall, it has become the premier place for young people to meet and hang out, mainly on Saturday afternoon. Added to the fact that the mall is a hot spot young people find it almost instinctive to go to the mall to hang out, have something to eat, surf the web or just to see who they might run into. Young people put on their best outfits and head for the mall on Saturday afternoons just to have a good time, and look good doing so. The city mall promises to be one of the most exciting and important places that will be involved in shaping the cultural development of the new breed of Guyanese.


By Andrew Ross

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11Sep/07

Guyana Night 2007

Guyana Nite 2007 was hailed, in many regards, a successful event this year. The event was hosted at the Guyana National Stadium at Providence on the East Bank of Demerara. The event attracted businesses, both large and small, which have a vested interest in the agricultural sector in Guyana and its development.

When taking the location and level of entertainment expected at the event, it was really very affordable. The cost of entering the stadium was just $300 per person. This made the event a very attractive feature especially for those living on the East Bank. There were large crowds gathered at the entrance of the show with persons eager to get in. The line I was in extended all the way to the Buddy’s Int’l Hotel, located approximately 300 meters away from the stadium’s entrance. This also shows the capacity of the facility. The security at the facility was undoubtedly tight given the fact that it was handled by both the Lions Club and the Guyana Police Force. As a result, criminal elements were dissuaded from entering the venue. There were also female ranks of the Police Force to search the women and children. This showed initiative on the part of the organizers. This aspect of security preparations is usually taken for granted by organizers of other events. No backup at the security checkpoints allowed the free movement of persons onto the grounds. The efficiency and courtesy on the part of those handling security must be applauded.

The presentations themselves were well displayed in spacious white tents. The arrangement of the boots available for display was done in such a way that the entire ground was fully utilized. Space was abundant allowing a multitude of persons to be able to enter the compound, interact and move freely.

The businesses which brought their produce out for display came not only from within the immediate sphere of the agriculture industry but also from industries utilizing the by-products of agriculture products. They came from the agriculture sector, the craft industry as well as the food and drinks producing sectors. They represented the small stall holders, the large regional companies, as well as the government. Some of the larger companies on show were Sterling Products Ltd., Banks D.I.H. and Demerara Distillers Ltd. Representing the smaller production companies were the Culture Ambassadors and a few other craft industries. There were also food and drinks bars compliments of M&M’s Snackette, along with the beverage producing giants: Guyana Banks and DDL. One of the most memorable displays for me was the company which bottles coconut water. This industry has the potential to really thrive once it is taken seriously. The amount of coconuts which go to waste all over this great land of ours can be used to generate money not only from local markets but from the region, and even internationally. There was also no shortage of entertainment for those in attendance. The entertainment for this event was taken care of by local soca star Malo, Mingles Sound Machine, Travelers’ Sound System and The New Melody Makers’ Band. These entertainers kept the crowd lively with songs from today’s hottest artistes and ensured that they did not miss a beat. There was a small contingent of the crowd who had probably already seen all the exhibits and was just taking some drinks while enjoying the music being produced for their enjoyment. This crowd seemed to be enjoying themselves very much. The Guyana National Stadium hosted people from all across Guyana and from all walks of life, including the Honorable Prime Minister, Mr. Samuel Hinds along with the Minister of Agriculture, Mr. Robert Persaud who paid keen attention to the displays. This government sanctioned event was hailed a success by all patrons as well as those whose products were on display.

by Andrew Ross

11Sep/07

Things That Just Do Not Make Sense – To Me

If you have read any of the other articles that I have written, you would have seen that I have ‘a bit’ of an issue with many things in our society that may generally go unnoticed. I have been told that I have a lot of time on my hands, and maybe this is true. Whatever the case may be, I am back to highlight yet another set of thorns I’ve come across.

  • Not too long ago the Guyana Lottery Company produced an advertisement which featured a young man who showed unreciprocated interest in a young lady just after purchasing a lottery ticket. Her reaction was very different, however, after he won and rolled up in his “shiny new ride” adorned in his “bling.” The follow-up to this advertisement featured the same young lady in a club setting with a few friends. She announced to them that she won money through the lottery and upon hearing this, the same young man who had won in the initial advertisement stopped his game of pool and approached her. She responded by showing him the ticket and laughing. What on earth was that supposed to mean? If a different male was used I would have perhaps gotten the point, but it simply made no sense to me. It certainly is no wonder that its life span on television was infinitesimal.
  • I have accurately been called a “Cultural Centre Junkie”, because more than likely, once there is a show I’m there, especially when it pertains to dance. I am seldom late to any production, but am very well-acquainted with the rule that should one arrive late only the side aisles are to be used. The purpose for this, I have been told, is to minimize disturbances to those who have honored the scheduled time. Tell me though, how much sense it makes to make someone use the side aisle when his or her seat is the seat at the centre aisle? Would he or she not disturb more people by excusing him or herself across an entire row? Then again, I may be just a bit daft in this area.
  • The $99.00 store. No further comment.
  • I do not understand why so many people think that it is “cool” to misspell when naming their business. One example—and I am only stating this one because it is the most recent one that I have come across—is the card store in the City Mall called “Kards” something or the other.
  • I was recently at the doctor’s office and while waiting to be attended to I overheard a conversation between two women. They were talking about different ways of preparing the same dish, a conversation which developed into a discussion on healthy eating alternatives. One of the women indicated that she needs to cut down on her oil intake. The other quickly responded: “Yeah girl, especially wit dis cholesterol that goin’ roun’.” I fought so hard to contain my laughter as I thought, “Hmm, so it’s contagious now huh; interesting...”
  • Have you ever been to the doctor’s office and had to take a test which required a urine sample? You are given a clear cup and sent to do your business. This is very likely nothing to fuss about for the majority of the world, but of course I have something to say on the matter. I am always at a loss as to how much is too much, but I do not want to throw away any in case they make some error or simply run out of urine. My suggestion is that the cups be marked with a line indicating the required volume. What do you think?
  • In my opinion one's toilet should be sort of a sanctuary where one can go to relax and accomplish what one has set out to do in peace. It should be a place free from any kind of excitement and work. Nothing that goes on in there should cause any amount of worry or stress. Why then do some people feel the need to install their toilet paper dispener BEHIND the toilet?Maybe it's just me, but that tends to interfere with the smooth flow of things.

I find things that get to me on an almost daily basis, but I only recently started recording them. As I inevitably stumble upon more, they will be added.

-Bless

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8Sep/07

Older, But Still Doing Nonsense

I think it was last year, or may the year before; I do not recall, but I attended one of those AIDS shows at the National Cultural Centre and of course the usual entourage of fashionably-dressed homosexuals presented itself. The majority of the lot was young, but there was an older one. Heavens, you have no idea how annoyed and thoroughly disgusted I was to see him, ah the individual there. One old hard-back cockroach with an earring, a pair of tight pants and a sway in his walk. Here is my take on the matter: homosexuality is wrong; no one is born that way so do not bring that to me. However, if when one is young one experiments, or one has homosexual tendencies because of some abuse one has suffered then alright fine- I believe that with time, counseling and support one can overcome this. But when I see a grown, supposed-to-be “older and wiser” man, walking and swaying with a homosexual entourage, I am most outraged.

Experiment if you must in your young age, but get sense by your winter years.
-Bless

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7Sep/07

Suarez Family Circus

The Suarez Family Circus has finally returned to the shores of Guyana. If my memory serves me right, the last time they were here they left a memorable impression on the Guyanese public, and also left many persons wanting more. This time they came with a show that is even bigger and better than last time. The Suarez Family Circus is hardly a new phenomenon since the circus came into being in the year 1872! With 135 years of experience you can be sure to expect a wonderful and entertaining presentation from skilled performers. Despite the years that have passed, the management of the circus has still remained within the Suarez family.

Under the management of Ivan Suarez, the circus comes to the capital after creating ripples in Berbice. Although they recently came from Berbice it was hardly their first show for the year. Prior to coming to Guyana they graced the shores of over 15 countries including the USA, Mexico, Argentina, Guatemala, Barbados, Trinidad & Tobago, Costa Rica, Curacao, Aruba, Canada and Dominica. With this level of international exposure the Guyanese public can expect sheer professionalism, and the best performance possible.

The opening night was a spectacle of performances that will be repeated throughout their stint in Georgetown. The first performance of the evening was a balancing act. A man, accompanied by two beautiful ladies, came out to the center of the big tent. The attendants brought out a pole about 10 ft. long and the man proceeded to balance the pole on his forehead while one of the models climbed the pole to the top and then did a handstand. Remember that all this happened while the man still balanced the pole on his forehead without the assistance of cables! I remember thinking "this dude must drink a lot of milk, because his neck must be really strong." The same was repeated by the second female. She did an acrobatic show on the pole balancing on the man's head. This was an excellent way to kick off the show.

Immediately following was a clown who came out and started selecting members from the crowd to be involved in a game. He selected both male and female, of all ages to participate. He led them to the center of the tent and gave each of them a bell and instructed them to ring it when he pointed to them. This was particularly entertaining because some of the people didn't quite understand the point of the game until it got going. There was this one girl who was dancing with the clown and kicked her shoe into the crowd. This was a great way to build the audience's anticipation even more.

Following this was a man who performed tricks on a bicycle. He did some things on the bicycle that I did not know were humanly possible. He did some things we all tried at some time or the other while learning to ride; things like riding backwards and balancing on the handle while the bike is still moving. The only difference between us and him was he was successful at all the stunts he did. And just when you thought his performance was over a pedestal was brought out. The man placed his bicycle on this pedestal and proceeded to perform some more near impossible tricks. There was one low point in his performance when he fell off his bicycle. This did not discourage him though; he just got up, put his bike back on the pedestal and proceeded to complete his trick. He fit his entire body through the frame of the bicycle while still balancing it on the pedestal. This was a fete to watch and was almost unbelievable. He then proceeded to offer US$1000 to a young man in the crowd if he could ride a bicycle. The bicycle was unlike the ordinary,it was the world's smallest bicycle. The young man tried but his efforts were futile. After two failed attempts, the performer proved to us that it was indeed possible to ride "the world's smallest bicycle!"

Next in line was "The hoola hoop lady." She was not satisfied with one hoop, she spun three one time; beginning with all three around her waist she skillfully moved one up to her neck then one down to her feet. After this impressive display she took it to another level by being hoisted into the air while still spinning the hoops. This was especially pleasing to the crowd gathered. Just when you though she was finished the attendants brought out a giant hoop which almost took over the entire center of the tent. Unbelievable as it may seem she somehow managed to spin that giant hoop despite her size. This was quite entertaining to watch. Another clown came out to interact with the crowd in order to let those in attendance know that they were as much a part of the show as the actual circus team.

Immediately following the clown's exit a trainer brought out the giraffe. This was much to the surprise and amazement to those in attendance, most of whom have never seen a giraffe other than on television. This was especially nice for the children. Some children were selected from the gathering to offer the giraffe food. They were placed at various points in the big tent as the animal went around eating from the children's hands. This was a very special and memorable event in the lives of many, if not all, the children present.

The clown once again came out in order to distract the crowd as the crew set the stage for the next performance. The next act was another acrobatic display, but this one had a twist. The female performer had a short pole, about a foot long, brought out with mouthpiece attachment. She then proceeded to bite into the mouthpiece, and then letting her hands leave the platform and her butt touching the back of her head, she proceeded to spin with just her mouth holding her up! She must have some strong teeth; I wonder what toothpaste she used? There was then a period of intermission where patrons were given an opportunity to purchase refreshments from the concession stands. There was also a booth where patrons could purchase souvenirs that would remind them of the circus.

During intermission the staff took the opportunity to set up the cage that was used in the next act. When the music resumed and the lights brightened there was quite a pleasurable and wonderful sight to behold. There, standing in the middle of the cage was a man holding a bullwhip and surrounded by 8 tigers -3 white and 5 golden- Bengal tigers! They were on stools placed around the inside of the cage and were patiently awaiting their trainer's instructions. If you want to know what he had the tigers doing be sure to visit the Suarez Family Circus at the Softball Ground on Carifesta Avenue.

Next was the tight rope. There were two men high above the crowd without any straps to keep them from falling, or safety nets to catch them if they did, walking across a tight rope using only a long metal pole to keep their balance. This had the crowd in a tense mode enjoying the show while at the same time hoping they did not fall. Then one other man walked on a tight wire that started in the crowd and went all the way to the top of the tent. There was a moment while he was near the top when he lost his balance which had the crowd uneasy and just a little fearful. This was not all, however, they took the stunt to another level using bicycles that had just rims to ride across 30 ft of cable wire with nothing other than long poles to help them keep balance. Picture these two guys on bicycles connected by a steel rod and another guy on the steel rod connecting the two on a bicycle and staying on a wire suspended no less than 30 ft in the air. This mind boggling stunt was performed with perfection.

Following their display the clown once again tried to distract the crowd as the attendants set up a huge iron ball at the center of the big tent with seating capacity of 2000 or more persons. After the clown had done his thing there was time for just one more act. There was the smell of gasoline mixed with smoke then the loud roar of two dirt bikes coming from the back of the tent. In a few seconds two performers rode out on the bikes. They proceeded to enter the cage and rode dangerously fast and close to each other without crashing. When your racing heart thought it was over another bike entered the tent and was admitted to the cage. These bikes somehow had enough room in the circular cage to ride around without crashing into each other. Just when you thought 3 bikes in a cage were enough for you to handle, 2 more bikes entered the cage! By then, I was thinking "somebody's going to have to be carried out of this situation," since from my standpoint there was no way all 5 of these bikes could move in that ball without a collision. Well I was wrong because they accomplished this unforgettable task effortlessly.
This was the final act of the evening. The show closed as all the performers returned to the stage followed by the riders, two of whom carried the Mexican and Guyanese flags respectively. This was the most fitting way to end such a wonderful and memorable event. Be sure to check out the Suarez Family Circus. And for exclusive pictures from the circus be sure to check out our galler.

By Andrew Ross

3Sep/07

Karma Bowling Alley

One of the most anticipated places to have a good time in the capital city has finally opened its doors. Karma bowling alley brings a taste of North American entertainment to the shores of Guyana. This new entertainment spot is conveniently located in Industrial Site Ruimveldt away from the hustle and bustle of downtown Georgetown. There are ample parking facilities, catering to the comfort of the patrons. The security at the facility is of an exceptionally high standard in an effort to allow patrons to enjoy themselves without the fear of anything happening to their vehicles parked outside. The security at the door is also equipped with metal detectors to ensure that no illegal weapons enter the building, further ensuring the security of the guests. This initiative on the proprietors’ part is to be commended.

Upon entering the building the first attraction, found on the eastern wall, is a big projection of either the hottest music videos or the most recent movie. This brings an inviting atmosphere to the establishment from the very beginning. With such a first impression one anticipates so much more, and I’m pleased to report that it does not disappoint. The entrance to the bowling alley is clearly visible from the main entrance. There are comfortable seating accommodations located in the air conditioned bowling alley. There is also a projection of videos on the eastern wall within the bowling alley of itself which just adds to the entertainment. This multi-dimensional establishment affords its patrons the opportunity to bowl, or look at one of the many television screens present while enjoying a cold beverage.

Though the bowling is the main attraction at this location, there is also a large hall equipped with two air hockey tables and several pool tables. So just in case the bowling lanes are unavailable shooting pools to pass the time, while listening to great music is always an option. Karma is currently the hottest hang out spot in the city. Everywhere I go there are people talking about going to the bowling alley. There is a buzz going around that there will be a club opening on the upper level of the building. If this is true it will be an excellent addition to the entertainment scene in the city. By all indications, if the rumors are true, the club should be open by the end of the year. The highly anticipated night club will definitely add to the popularity of the location as an entertainment spot. Taking everything into consideration this place promises to be the one-stop location for entertainment.

 by Andrew Ross

1Sep/07

Guyana Night

Guyana Nite 2007 was hailed, in many regards, a successful event this year. The event was hosted at the Guyana National Stadium at Providence on the East Bank of Demerara. The event attracted businesses, both large and small, which have a vested interest in the agricultural sector in Guyana and its development.

When taking the location and level of entertainment expected at the event, it was really very affordable. The cost of entering the stadium was just $300 per person. This made the event a very attractive feature especially for those living on the East Bank. There were large crowds gathered at the entrance of the show with persons eager to get in. The line I was in extended all the way to the Buddy's Int'l Hotel, located approximately 300 meters away from the stadium's entrance. This also shows the capacity of the facility. The security at the facility was undoubtedly tight given the fact that it was handled by both the Lions Club and the Guyana Police Force. As a result, criminal elements were dissuaded from entering the venue. There were also female ranks of the Police Force to search the women and children. This showed initiative on the part of the organizers. This aspect of security preparations is usually taken for granted by organizers of other events. No backup at the security checkpoints allowed the free movement of persons onto the grounds. The efficiency and courtesy on the part of those handling security must be applauded.

The presentations themselves were well displayed in spacious white tents. The arrangement of the bootsavailable for display was done in such a way that the entire ground was fully utilized. Space was abundant allowing a multitude of persons to be able to enter the compound, interact and move freely.

The businesses which brought their produce out for display came not only from within the immediate sphere of the agriculture industry but also from industries utilizing the by-products of agriculture products. They came from the agriculture sector, the craft industry as well as the food and drinks producing sectors. They represented the small stall holders, the large regional companies, as well as the government. Some of the larger companies on show were Sterling Products Ltd., Banks D.I.H. and Demerara Distillers Ltd. Representing the smaller production companies were the Culture Ambassadors and a few other craft industries. There were also food and drinks bars compliments of M&M's Snackette, along with the beverage producing giants: Guyana Banks and DDL. One of the most memorable displays for me was the company which bottles coconut water. This industry has the potential to really thrive once it is taken seriously. The amount of coconuts which go to waste all over this great land of ours can be used to generate money not only from local markets but from the region, and even internationally. There was also no shortage of entertainment for those in attendance. The entertainment for this event was taken care of by local soca star Malo, Mingles Sound Machine, Travelers' Sound System and The New Melody Makers' Band. These entertainers kept the crowd lively with songs from today's hottest artistes and ensured that they did not miss a beat. There was a small contingent of the crowd who had probably already seen all the exhibits and was just taking some drinks while enjoying the music being produced for their enjoyment. This crowd seemed to be enjoying themselves very much. The Guyana National Stadium hosted people from all across Guyana and from all walks of life, including the Honorable Prime Minister, Mr. Samuel Hinds along with the Minister of Agriculture, Mr. Robert Persaud who paid keen attention to the displays. This government sanctioned event was hailed a success by all patrons as well as those whose products were on display.

By Andrew Ross